When your tenants are renting from you, your property becomes their home. Just as you wouldn’t want someone entering your primary residence whenever they felt like it, your tenants also have a right to privacy and peaceful enjoyment of the property.

This doesn’t mean that you can never enter the premises. Landlords and managers will usually enter for a couple of different reasons:

  • Making agreed upon repairs
  • Inspection of the property
  • Showing the property to potential buyers
  • Emergency situation

Some states also allow landlords to enter in case of a tenant’s extended absence. This is usually to make repairs or take care of maintenance tasks a tenant would normally perform while at home.

How much notice do you give?

Each state has a different amount of time required to give tenants notice for entry. In the case where this isn’t specified, giving 24 hours’ notice is a safe bet. Tenants can always give approval for a landlord to enter sooner. For example, if a tenant requests a repair and a contractor has a last minute availability, the landlord can ask for the tenant's approval to enter sooner to make the repair.

It’s always a good idea to give your tenants written notice. Putting it in writing gives you a record of maintenance visits and inspections. It also protects you if your tenant claims you violated your state statutes for notice to enter the property. Post a written notice on their door, send a letter through certified mail, or use Tellus Home Chat to send notices and get read receipts on your phone.

In true emergencies, a landlord can enter a unit without advance notice or the tenant's permission. Examples of emergencies could include fire, flooding, a gas leak, or a physical altercation. If the tenant isn't home, it's best to leave a note explaining the emergency and why you needed to enter.

Here are the notice to enter requirements by state:

Alabama

Two days

Alaska

24 hours

Arizona

Two days. Does not apply if tenant has requested maintenance (assumed consent).

Arkansas

No requirements

California

24 hours, 48 hours for move-out inspection

Colorado

No requirements

Connecticut

Reasonable notice

Delaware

Two days

D.C.

48 hours

Florida

12 hours

Georgia

No requirements

Hawaii

Two days

Idaho

No requirements

Illinois

No requirements

Indiana

Reasonable notice

Iowa

24 hours

Kansas

Reasonable notice

Kentucky

Two days

Louisiana

No requirements

Maine

24 hours

Maryland

No requirements

Massachusetts

No requirements

Michigan

No requirements

Minnesota

Reasonable notice

Mississippi

No requirements

Missouri

No requirements

Montana

24 hours

Nebraska

One day

Nevada

24 hours

New Hampshire

Adequate notice under the circumstances

New Jersey

One day

New Mexico

24 hours

New York

No requirements

North Carolina

No requirements

North Dakota

Reasonable notice

Ohio

24 hours

Oklahoma

One day

Oregon

24 hours

Pennsylvania

No requirements

Rhode Island

Two days

South Carolina

24 hours

South Dakota

No requirements

Tennessee

24 hours, applies only in the final month of lease when landlord is showing the unit to prospective tenants.

Texas

No requirements

Utah

24 hours, unless otherwise specified by the lease

Vermont

48 hours

Virginia

24 hours for routine maintenance. No notice required if maintenance is at tenant’s request.

Washington

Two days. One day to show property.

West Virginia

No requirements

Wisconsin

Advance notice

Wyoming

No requirements